Highlands Anatomy class

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Highlands Anatomy class

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As the harsh winter weather is underway, Mr. Taladay’s lab is just heating up! In the month of January, anatomy teacher Matthew Taladay starts his traditional curriculum of dissection. Every year around this time, classroom D201 fills with the smell of dead frogs. Before the dissection starts, the kids learn first all the bones in the frog’s body. From the axillary, to the scapula, to the urostyle, they get familiar with every bone. As the process continues, the kids partner up and pick their frog they will be working with for the next couple weeks. The dissection starts right after that. Cutting open the frog is vile to some students, but luckily this year the class was full of those with strong stomachs. Once the frog is apart, the bones are the focus. Each bone must be cleared off with tools, then moved to the boiling station, then put into peroxide. Once all the bones are cleaned off and whitened, it’s time for the hard part, putting the frog’s skeleton back together. This can be done with the knowledge the students learned prior to the dissection. Doing a frog dissection helps the students learn more about the human anatomy and animals in general. As the students finish up their Skelton’s, they look forward to doing it again in the spring, but that time, with a rabbit.

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